The First Day Of Spring 01 September 2014

by Carol Jones on September 1, 2014

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Male Superb Blue Wren

It’s the 1st day of spring in my rural patch.

And this male Superb Fairy Wren only has eyes for his Missus.

She was perching with him in the bare thorns of this blackberry. But takes flight just as I push the shutter button.

And his eyes follow her as she lands a few branches away.

Within seconds, he’s by her side once more.

And they hop, skip and jump in and out of the blackberry, chirping away like happy kids in a playground.

Spring is the season of eternal optimism. Of new beginnings. Of dazzling expectations.

No other season delivers unbridled hope with such a punch.

It really does put a ‘spring’ in your step.

And I hope your spring delivers!

All the best,

~Carol, Ironing Diva❤

Purveyor Of The Tantrum Free Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover And Other Goodies
Made with love and care in rural Australia by men and women who have a disability.

Ironing Diva Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover Top

Like this post? Share it with your family and friends on . . .

Facebook.

Google+.

LinkedIn.

Have a question? Email me.

Or phone me, Carol Jones, in rural Australia on 02 63 588 511.

Photos of my rural property are courtesy of me, Ironing Diva – who is also known as a Paddock Paparazzi – and taken at sunrise every morning.

Male Superb Fairy Wren As A Whirligig

Bath time for this male Superb Fairy Wren.   He looks like a whirligig, drying his feathers.

PS. And I have a fabulous newsletter ‘A Smidgen Of Gossip’. This is what a subscriber says about it. “Carol. Just had some time to read it and found that it is, as with everything you do, rather wonderful. A great read. W” You can subscribe to it by clicking this link. It’s FREE! This is not a lifetime commitment. You can Unsubscribe at any time. Don’t miss out. Click this link now!

And you can follow The Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover on Facebook here.

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What You Need To Be A Happy Ironer

by Carol Jones on August 5, 2014

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P1990613 Ironing Diva Crimson Rosella

Ironing is both a lifestyle choice.

And a skill.

And as with everything we do that matters, there are some essential ingredients that make for a happy ironer.

You know those recipes that espouse great cooking with only 4 ingredients?

Ironing beats that. You only need 3 essential ingredients.

Ingredient number one.

An iron that doesn’t leak.

That holds its temperature.

And isn’t cobbled together with cheap components that will not only blow your fuses, but rust out within the blink of an eye.

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A Pink Galah in a Eucalyptus Stringybark

Three brands that I trust?

Morphy Richards. I have one and LOVE it. It’s a favourite amongst the most dedicated ironers in Europe.

Philips. The most popular brand in Australia.

DeLonghi. My customers who have one wax lyrical about them.

You can choose between a standard steam iron.

Or the now more popular steam station irons. Because they’ve become so much cheaper.

But read the literature. How long does it take to heat up? And cool down? And does it have a sleep control? If you have ironers in your home who forget to turn an iron off, you MUST have one with a sleep control.

And hold one in your hand. Irons are not a one size fits all.

I like a heavy iron. And am fussy about the handle.

And beware. More holes do not mean better ironing. A customer told me her steam station iron had so many holes – it was like ironing with a geyser in her hand.

P1990892 Ironing Diva Kookaburra

A Kookaburra in a Eucalyptus Yellowbox

And that old truism of – you get what you pay for – applies to irons. A $29 to $49 iron is not going to cut it in the long term. Philips makes cheap irons. And expensive ones. There is no such thing as best quality – cheapest price. Pay more and you will get an iron that will last a few years.

I paid well over $100 for my Morphy Richards iron. That was 7 years ago. And it shows no signs of aging badly.

All irons need some maintenance.

Before you iron, you should always check the soleplate for signs of unwanted residue.

Even non-stick bases attract glug and sludge.

If it’s sticky, it will mark your garments or patchwork.

What’s the best way to clean the bottom of an iron?

I use Gumption. Yes. Gumption. Over the kitchen sink. It removes sticky residue like magic. And polishes the top of the iron as well.

To remove the Gumption from the holes, put water in a pitcher and pour over the holes. It washes right out.

Stay tuned. There’s more. Next post.

All the best,

~Carol, Ironing Diva❤

Purveyor Of The Tantrum Free Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover And Other Goodies

FLAG Full Video Icon 350W x 345H 2014 July 14 copy
Made with love and care in rural Australia by men and women who have a disability.

Ironing Diva Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover Top

Like this post? Share it with your friends and family on . . .

Facebook.

Google+.

LinkedIn.

Have a question? Email me.

Or phone me, Carol Jones, in rural Australia on 02 63 588 511.

Photos of my rural property are courtesy of me, Ironing Diva – who is also known as a Paddock Paparazzi – and taken at sunrise every morning.

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Mr & Mrs Hooded Robin on my rural fence

The header photo is a beautiful Crimson Rosella in a blackberry bush

PS. And I have a fabulous newsletter ‘A Smidgen Of Gossip’. This is what a subscriber says about it. “Carol. Just had some time to read it and found that it is, as with everything you do, rather wonderful. A great read. W” You can subscribe to it by clicking this link. It’s FREE! This is not a lifetime commitment. You can Unsubscribe at any time. Don’t miss out. Click this link now!

Follow The Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover on Facebook here.

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P1230784 Ironing Diva Willie On Nest

Every child needs life skills. So motivate your child by thinking like a child.

In your child’s excitement to become independent by leaving home to discover what the big wide world has to offer, they also discover there’s no one to cook, clean, do the laundry and iron their clothes. There’s also the garbage, car maintenance, making their money stretch until next payday, finding a place to live and selecting the best flat mates.

Some things your child has to learn on the hop.

Other things can be learned at home at a young age with mum and dad’s help.

This is about helping your child learn how to iron.

Unless they aspire to be street kids or fall on their well-heeled feet and land an important job with a huge salary as soon as they leave home and can afford a personal ironer, they need to know how to iron so their clothes look good.

The most important criteria in this exercise are both your attitude to ironing and your ability to teach them how to iron.

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Your Attitude

If you hate ironing and always grumble about it, don’t bother. It won’t work. You can’t teach a skill to someone if you hate doing it yourself.

Your Ability To Teach

If you’re impatient and grouchy, again don’t bother. You can’t teach if you can’t inspire.

I’m assuming that you have both an interest in and a desire to help your child.

So let’s go.

What You’ll Need

1. It’s always helpful to have the ability to remember what it was like when you were a child.

2. Patience. Lots of it.

Remember back to when you were a kid and learning how to ride your bike. How many times did you fall off before you finally mastered the skill and took off by yourself?

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3. A sense of humour.

It goes a long way towards diffusing a tense moment. Again, remember back to when you were a child. Learning a skill like tying your shoelaces seemed to escape your grasp. My mother laughed when I tied both my shoes together and I couldn’t move. Her laughter reassured me this was a mistake that really didn’t matter.

4. The skill to correct their mistakes in a positive way.

This is a tough one because parents are so used to constantly correcting their child so they do better; and aren’t always aware their manner is gruff, abrupt and unfriendly.

For example.

A local shopkeeper had their two pre-teen children in their shop for the afternoon. All I heard while I was there was, “…No, you can’t touch that. No, don’t do that. That’s not the way I want you to stack those items.” Is this the way you want to be talked to? I don’t think so. So keep that sort of talk out of the learning experience.

A better way to approach it is to let your child know that what they’ve done isn’t right. Yes, they need to know if they’ve done something incorrectly. But tell them that with practice, you know they’ll be better at it than you. That’s correcting, reassuring and inspiring them with just a few words.

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5. Don’t expect too much too soon.

Even though ironing isn’t rocket science, your child won’t fail at life if they don’t master the ironing skills of a professional valet or butler or master tailor. You’re teaching them a skill that will help them conquer the domestic requirements of their life. That’s all they need.

What’s the right age to teach your child how to iron? Between the ages of 8 and 10. I learned to iron when I was 8.

There’s a good reason to start that early. The most important one being your child is still in love with you. This is the ‘pre-hormone raging’ era where you’re still up there with God in their eyes. They haven’t yet devised a plan to obstruct your parental authority, become sullen, withdrawn and want to be anywhere, so long as it’s not with you!

This is the age where your child still likes to do things with you. Hanging out with mum and dad is still a part of their life.

Read anyone’s memoir and their fondest childhood memories are from that age, being taught something by a loving parent. Whether it was learning to fish or learning to sew, their sheer joy was in hanging out with mum or dad and doing grown up things with them.

Ironing is a ‘grown up thing’.

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The best introduction is to get your child to help with the laundry. Not on their own, but together, with you. Make this a chance to gossip and have a little bit of fun together. This benefits both of you. Folding laundry can be turned into a social occasion for you and your child.

The next step is to introduce them to ironing. Again, with you. Remember, this is hanging out with mum and dad stuff. Starting with handkerchiefs is always safe. And this way the whole family finally gets ironed handkerchiefs! Cloth napkins are also safe, as are tea towels, pillowcases, anything straight that can be ironed quickly. Speed in finishing is the criteria here. Nothing too hard to scare them off.

And get them their own mini board and mini iron. So they can iron right beside you.

I hear you laughing and harrumphing. With scorn, no less.

Why not?

You’ve spent a gazillion dollars up to now on their toys. You’ve also spent how many $$$$$$$ on a variety of useless objects for them. Why not spend some money on tools for a skill they take into adulthood; that helps you with some of your chores; and allows you to spend some quality time with your child doing something together?

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This is a new approach, isn’t it?

But think about it.

Get back to when you were a child. At age 8 or 10, objects are still too big. A mini board, a mini iron, are just the right size for a child. Sort of like Goldilocks finding the right bed to sleep in. And it belongs to them. Ownership of the tools can lead to ownership of the skill.

Helping your child learn how to iron is more than just whipping out the ironing board, handing them the iron, standing them on a stool and telling them to ‘go to it’. It’s about motivating them and inspiring them to begin with.

And that’s all about you.

This is how many men and women learn to do things. At the knees of their loving parents.

So go to it. It’s in your child’s best interests to succeed.

Stay tuned for the next instalment of How To Help Your Child Learn How To Iron. I’ll tell you how to find a mini board and mini iron.

And when they grow up, along with the car keys. . . they’ll want a Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover.

FLAG Full Video Icon 350W x 345H 2014 July 14 copy

Because they will expect to iron tantrum free. And this is one of the reasons why this cover has more than 300,000 customers in 29 countries. Because it lives up to its name. It ‘Fitz Like A Glove™’ every time you iron.

All the best,

~Carol, Ironing Diva❤

Purveyor Of The Tantrum Free Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover And Other Goodies
Made with love and care in rural Australia by men and women who have a disability.

Ironing Diva Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover Top

Know someone who wants to teach their children how to iron and have fun at the same time?

Share this post with them on Twitter.

Facebook.

Google+.

LinkedIn.

Have a question? Email me.

Or phone me, Carol Jones, in rural Australia on 02 63 588 511.

Photos of my rural property are courtesy of me, Ironing Diva – who is also known as a Paddock Paparazzi – and taken at sunrise every morning.

P1280801 Ironing Diva Crimson Rosellas

PS. And I have a fabulous newsletter ‘A Smidgen Of Gossip’. This is what a subscriber says about it. “Carol. Just had some time to read it and found that it is, as with everything you do, rather wonderful. A great read. W” You can subscribe to it by clicking this link. It’s FREE! This is not a lifetime commitment. You can Unsubscribe at any time. Don’t miss out. Click this link now!

And you can follow The Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover on Facebook here.

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Cotton Fabric. As Old As Prehistoric Man.

by Carol Jones on July 14, 2014

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P1660346 Ironing Diva Hanging Tree Sunburst

I love cotton. I just love it because of the way it looks.

Feels.

Smells.

Nothing. And I mean NOTHING compares to the crisp look of a pure cotton shirt or blouse.

And when laundered and dried in the sun, it has that unmistakable perfume of sunshine.

For me. Synthetics will never cut it.

But then, cotton goes all the way back to prehistoric times. So our ancestors knew more than we give them credit for.

Cotton has been spun, woven, and dyed since 7000BC. It was used because of its sturdiness. Durability. And ease of acquisition.

It was easy to grow because the cotton plant itself is a member of the Hibiscus family. With beautiful pink blossoms for a short time only.

But it does have its drawbacks.

In today’s modern world where the demand for cotton is high . . .

It’s also a BIG user of water.

And pesticides in its production. It gets attacked by many insects – is this because it’s so cuddly and lovely to be near?

And genetically modified cotton is not resistant to every bug that loves it.

So there is a big move on to grow organic cotton. Albeit in small quantities.

The cotton of yesteryear was a harsher, rougher fabric than the cotton we know today. Because it was hand spun on spinning wheels. So the fibre was uneven.

The technology to spin fine cotton has made a vast improvement in the type of cotton fabric we buy today. And spinning technology is so vast and technical, there’s virtually a machine for every type of fabric created.

And these days, cotton can be woven into thirteen different types of fabrics from nappies to velveteen.

Nappy Cloth is a twill, dobby or plain woven absorbent cotton fabric.

And why is it perfect for nappies?

Because. . .

Not only is cotton soft next to the skin. But cotton becomes stronger when wet. So there’s no chance that a wet nappy is going to disintegrate before it’s changed!

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Dimity is sheer, thin, white or printed fabric with lengthwise cords, stripes or checks.

Drill is a strong twilled cotton fabric, used in men’s and women’s slacks.

Heavy duty cotton drill is used in many chef’s aprons because it’s thick enough to protect the wearer from heat.

Duck is a heavy, durable tightly woven fabric. Heavy weight drill is used in awnings, tents, etc. Lighter duck is used in summer clothing.

Flannel cotton is plain or twill weave with a slight nap on one or both sides.

Flannelette is a soft cotton fabric with a nap on one side.

In cold climates, who doesn’t love the feel of crawling into a bed of warm Flannelette sheets?!

Gauze is a sheer, lightly woven fabric similar to cheesecloth. Is also made in silk.

This is what photographers put over their lens to make their subjects look more alluring.

Gingham is a lightweight, washable, stout fabric that is woven in checks, plaids or stripes.

Who hasn’t loved the look of that bygone era when we wore gingham dresses? Shirts? And blouses? And it’s making a comeback!

Lawn is a plain weave, soft, very light, combed cotton fabric with a crisp finish.

A fabric of many uses, including interlining of suits and jackets. As a sewer who has made many garments, lawn was a staple in my sewing closet.

Muslin is a sheer to coarse plain woven cotton fabric. Muslin comes in “natural” colour or is dyed.

We use this to strain the whey out of yoghurt so it becomes lovely and thick, like Greek yoghurt. And of course, is a good dressing for wounds.

Organdy is a very thin, transparent cotton with a crisp finish.

Many a bride’s dress has been made out of beautiful organdy.

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Outing Flannel is a soft, twill or plain weave fabric napped on both sides. Used for baby clothes, diapers, and sleepwear.

Oxford is shirting fabric with a lustrous, soft finish. It is characterized with narrow stripes and can be woven in plain or basket weave. Also a term used for wool fabric that has black and white fibres.

This is how the well known ‘Oxford Shirt’ got its name.

Percale is a light weight, closely woven, sturdy fabric that can be found printed or in dark or light colours.

My mother only bought percale sheets. A high thread count made them very soft. And although expensive, they were also economical because they were tough and would last for a generation.

Pima Cotton, from Egyptian cotton, is an excellent quality cotton fabric.

Polished Cotton is either a satin weave cotton or a plain weave cotton that is finished chemically to appear shiny.

Another fabric from a bygone era. Polished cotton was used in curtains and tablecloths back in that other century.

Poplin is a plain weave fabric with a cross-wise rib.

Poplin blouses were another of those garments from that other century.

Sailcloth is a very strong, heavy canvas or duck made in plain weave.

Sateen is a satin weave cotton fabric.

Our original Mr Chin’s Laundry Bags were made of Cotton Sateen. Absolutely beautiful. But a hard fabric to find today.

Seersucker is a lightweight cotton fabric crinkled into lengthwise stripes.

I read recently that when Paul Newman met Joanne Woodward, he owned only one suit. Made of Seersucker. And he washed it every night. Being a quick drying fabric, it was ready to wear the next day. And he ironed it every morning so he could look fabulous when he saw her!

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Swiss is a sheer, very fine cotton that can be plain or decorated with dots or other designs.

The original polka dot fabric. And used in its day for veils on pillbox hats.

Terry Cloth is a looped pile fabric that is either woven or knitted. Very absorbent and used for towels, etc. French terry cloth is looped on one side and sheared pile on the other.

Six Star hotels provide luxurious Terry Cloth bathrobes for their guests. And encourage them to take them home. Because. They did anyway! Now, their ‘gift’ is costed into the room rate.

Velveteen is an all cotton pile fabric with short pile resembling velvet.

As a child in New York City, I remember wearing dresses and coats of velveteen made by my couture dressmaker mother. And being so warm and cosy on a cold New York City winter’s day.

What makes cotton today a much softer and flexible fabric is the high thread content in the weave. The more threads, the closer the weave and the more beautiful the fabric.

And this is the cotton used for today’s garments. Which are much easier to iron and are more wrinkle free than ever.

Australia is the 4th largest exporter of cotton. And our biggest customer is China. Even though China is also the biggest grower of cotton. China needs to import more cotton just to serve its domestic market.

Australia exports over 99% of the cotton grown in OZ. There’s virtually no spinning industry left to value add to the cotton we grow.

I still remember the days of walking through Pyrmont and Ultimo in the 1970′s. And hearing the click clack of the knitting machines making fabrics and knitted garments out of locally grown and manufactured yarns of cotton and wool.

P1650497 Ironing Diva Fluffy Clouds

Did you know that:

One 227 kg cotton bale can produce:

. . .215 pairs of jeans

. . .250 single bed sheets

. . .750 shirts

. . .1,200 t-shirts

. . .2,100 pairs of boxer shorts

. . .3,000 nappies

. . .4,300 pairs of socks

. . .680,000 cotton balls!

How many bales of cotton are produced each year?

The biggest cotton exporters are the USA in first place. Second is India. Third is Brazil. And fifth is Uzbekistan.

The USA, the biggest exporter of cotton in the world, bales on average 17 Million bales a year.

And the state with the biggest cotton production is . . . TEXAS. Where everything is – of course – bigger than life!

Texas produces more than 5 Million bales every year. So it’s a bigger producer than Australia.

But, then, we ARE cotton minnows in a very large pool of sharks.

Australia’s production is on average 5 million bales.

There are about 1,500 cotton producing farms here. Mostly family owned enterprises. And they provide employment for about 8 farm workers at the busiest times. Which is during harvesting. All done by machines.

So cotton is a big contributor to the livelihoods of many a farmer and their surrounding communities.

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Why do we love cotton so much?

Because it’s natural.

For men and women with allergies, cotton is the fabric of choice
because it’s hypoallergenic. And it’s the only fabric with those qualities.

As I said. Cotton is pristine. And pure.

It keeps the body cool in summer because it’s breathable.

And because it’s a good conductor of heat, it’s warm in winter.

And I LOVE the cotton drill we use to make our Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Covers. Because it’s a strong, durable fabric with a diagonal weave.

And it soaks up the dye like a dog wanting to quench a big thirst. It gives me the most beautiful colours for my customers to select from.

We chose it because not only is it highly resistant to tearing and splitting.

But most importantly. It will tolerate the very high heat that we use when ironing fabrics like denim, linen, and of course, cotton!

FLAG Full Video Icon 350W x 345H 2014 July 14 copy

Believe me. This is one of the reasons why this cover has more than 300,000 customers in 29 countries. Because it can take the heat without wilting.

All the best,

~Carol, Ironing Diva❤

Purveyor Of The Tantrum Free Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover And Other Goodies
Made with love and care in rural Australia by men and women who have a disability.

Ironing Diva Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover Top

Know someone who hates the thin synthetic covers sold in shops?

And who hankers for a pure cotton cover to iron on?

All the best covers are now found online.

So help them find us.

Share this post with them on . . .

Twitter.

Facebook.

Google+.

LinkedIn.

Have a question? Email me.

Or phone me, Carol Jones, in rural Australia on 02 63 588 511.

Credits

Type Of Cotton Fabric http://info.fabrics.net/fabric-facts/glossary-of-cotton-fabrics-and-weaves/

History Of Cotton http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotton

Cotton Is Natural http://www.cottons.com.au/info/about/whycotton.php

Organic Cotton Fabric http://www.funkyfabrix.com.au/category_107/Organic-Cotton-Fabric.htm

Cotton Facts http://cottonaustralia.com.au/uploads/resources/CEK_Chap_7_Processing_From_Gin_To_Fabric.pdf

National Cotton Council Of America http://www.cotton.org/edu/faq/

Cotton Australia. The Australian Cotton Industry http://cottonaustralia.com.au/cotton-library/fact-sheets/cotton-fact-file-the-australian-cotton-industry

Photos of my rural property are courtesy of me, Ironing Diva – who is also known as a Paddock Paparazzi – and taken at sunrise every morning.

P1660184 Ironing Diva Holding Pen Golden Clouds

PS. And I have a fabulous newsletter ‘A Smidgen Of Gossip’. This is what a subscriber says about it. “Carol. Just had some time to read it and found that it is, as with everything you do, rather wonderful. A great read. W” You can subscribe to it by clicking this link. It’s FREE! This is not a lifetime commitment. You can Unsubscribe at any time. Don’t miss out. Click this link now!

And you can follow The Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover on Facebook here.

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The Battles Waged At The Ironing Board

by Carol Jones on June 30, 2014

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P1480303 Ironing Diva Mist

It’s Monday.

And Mary emailed me late today to say how much she loves her first ever Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover.

It arrived on Friday.

And by Saturday, she emptied her ironing basket. And can’t wait to iron again the following weekend.

True!

She told me this when I rang her to say how much I loved her email. And to thank her for taking the time to let me know.

And she said something to me that I’ve forgotten.

I’ve been ironing on a Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover for 20 years. And have a very dim memory of what it’s like to iron on a cheap supermarket cover.

Kind of like what women say after childbirth. Time diminishes the memory of the pain of labour.

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But Mary brought me back to earth when she said that she’s waged a battle for years at the ironing board.

And it goes like this.

Iron part of a shirt.

Adjust the cover.

Iron the next part of the shirt.

Adjust the cover.

Iron the sleeves.

Adjust the cover.

Make sure the cover is wrinkle free when ironing the collar. Don’t want to iron creases in. Only out.

Iron the shoulders.

Adjust the cover.

Every step of ironing is followed by having to adjust a cover that will not ever stay on the board.

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And her first road test of the Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover was the difference between a rusted out Holden and a super sleek Rolls Royce.

Is this you?

Waging a battle at the ironing board every time you want to iron?

You can win this tug of war with a simple click of your mouse.

Come visit me at The Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover And Other Goodies.

You won’t be sorry.

It is THE answer to every problem you have with an ironing board cover.

Ironing Diva flag full video icon

Trust me. This cover has more than 300,000 customers in 29 countries because it lives up to its name. It ‘Fitz Like A Glove™’ every time you iron.

~Carol Jones, Ironing Diva❤

Once more. You are just a mouse click away from tantrum free ironing.

Click my link below.

Purveyor Of The Tantrum Free Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover And Other Goodies

Made with love and care in RURAL Australia by men and women who have a disability.

Ironing Diva Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover Top

Know someone who wants to end their tug of war at the ironing board?

Share this post with them on Twitter.

Facebook.

Google+.

LinkedIn.

Have a question? Email me.

Or phone me, Carol Jones, in rural Australia on 02 63 588 511.

Photos of my rural property are courtesy of me, Ironing Diva – who is also known as a Paddock Paparazzi – and taken at sunrise every morning.

P1440891 Ironing Diva Paddock

PS. And I have a fabulous newsletter ‘A Smidgen Of Gossip’. This is what a subscriber says about it. “Carol. Just had some time to read it and found that it is, as with everything you do, rather wonderful. A great read. W” You can subscribe to it by clicking this link. It’s FREE! This is not a lifetime commitment. You can Unsubscribe at any time. Don’t miss out. Click this link now!

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A Week Of Glorious Sunrises & Mists.

by Carol Jones on June 22, 2014

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It’s often said that our environment affects our thoughts.

And our deeds.

For me, running a world wide business from my remote rural property in the beautiful Central Tablelands of NSW is pure bliss.

My sunrise dalliances every morning in the back paddocks both inspire me. And captivate me.

And I love sharing what I see with you.

Enjoy!

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~Carol Jones, Ironing Diva❤

Purveyor Of The Tantrum Free Fitz Like A Glove™ Ironing Board Cover And Other Goodies

Made with love and care in RURAL Australia by men and women who have a disability.

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Tips From The Ironing Diva. How To Remove Blood Stains. With A Twist.

June 22, 2014
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Having recently had to find a way to successfully remove dried blood stains. And ringing several friends who had not a clue. And having found the perfect solution. I thought I’d pass it on. But you know what? There are plenty of sites online that will give you the drill. Even though I found my [...]

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The First Day Of Winter. June 01 2014.

June 1, 2014
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The first day of every season writes its own story. Today, the sun kept its head firmly down. Under the doona. It was a bleak, windy, rainy entrance by the ‘First Day Of Winter’. I embrace the rain as it means green paddocks for many weeks to come. I do quietly love the wind as [...]

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Dear Joe Hockey

May 17, 2014
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Dear Joe Hockey, The papers and cyberspace are awash with the details of your recent budget. And I note your references to the ageing population as a burden to your government. And future governments. And therefore society as a whole. Tch. Tch. Joe. As a 48 year old, you are yourself the child of parents [...]

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I’m Living My Dream. But Not Quite How I Dreamed It.

May 11, 2014
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I’m the envy of all my friends. And my customers. Because I’m living my dream. I escaped the city lights. For the rural life. And now run a worldwide business from my beautiful remote rural property in the picturesque hills of the Central Tablelands of NSW. As a child growing up in New York City, [...]

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